Tag Archives: data

Lunar Mission One logo cropped LDS BL-01-1

digi.me and Lunar Mission One to send memories to the Moon

Digi.me has signed a deal with Lunar Mission One which will give our supporters the incredible opportunity to leave digital memories on the Moon.

Our app will give anyone who wants to the ability to create digital memory boxes that will reserve your place in space for future generations of space travellers to discover and enjoy.

To join us today and make your own history, all you have to do is use our app (download here if needed) to help you gather your most memorable moments from across your social media accounts.

You will be able to use images and text uploaded to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and other social media accounts, as well as your memories stored locally on your computer, to create your Digital Time Capsule, which will travel with Lunar Mission One to the Moon in 2024.

Julian Ranger, founder and Chairman of digi.me, said: “digi.me already allows you to take back control of personal information spread all over the web and hold it in one place where you can make it work for you. Now you can create your very own digital time capsule and select the best memories of you to send to the Moon.

“Both myself and digi.me are avid supporters of space exploration and we are delighted to be joining Lunar Mission One in making history in this way.”

Lunar Mission One has also just launched the Footsteps on the Moon campaign, which digi.me is proud to support. Everyone across the world, whether they use our app or not, is invited to upload an image of their own footprints, feet or shoes to make a mark on the Moon for free.  These images will then be digitised by digi.me so that they can be sent to the Moon on the Astrobotic Lander in 2017. Find out more about the Footsteps on the Moon campaign here.

Angela Lamont, Director of Communications for Lunar Mission One, said: “This is very exciting for us and our supporters. Millions of people will be sending their very own private digital archives to the Moon with us in 2024 and the digi.me app now gives them the ability to start curating their own collections using data from their own computer, or anything they’ve ever posted to social media.”

Lunar Mission One is the first global and inclusive lunar mission, which was initially crowd-funded by a highly successful Kickstarter campaign in 2014.

With its preparatory stage now complete, it now has teams in place to set up the mission, which will land at the as-yet-unexplored lunar south pole in 2024. It will carry equipment for scientific experiments, including a rig capable of drilling up to 100m into the Moon’s surface to analyse lunar geology on a scale never before attempted.

This borehole will then be used to deposit two archives; one compendium of life on Earth and one containing millions of private memory boxes created using digi.me, to give an epic picture of life on Earth in the 21st Century for discovery in a future far, far away.


British spies want shorter and less secure passwords

If you thought the purpose of passwords was to be as strong as possible to give your information and accounts the best chance of being secure, Britain’s spies at GCHQ have news for you.

In a new document, Password Guidance – simplifying your approach (PDF), the organisation’s cyber director said that advice has moved on from previous guidance to make passwords stronger as a greater deterrant to hacking.

Now, the spy agency is suggesting IT managers help install systems that make passwords easier to remember. Yes, you did read that right.

The report claims that the average UK user has 22 different online systems that are password protected – clearly more than most people can remember – with the same supposedly safe password used to access around four of these.

It says the need to remember multiple passwords for different sites leads to unsafe behaviour, such as writing them down, duplication, or using simple or predictable passwords creation strategies.

But it also stresses that, crucially, the bottom line is that even following best practice guidelines (ie not doing any of the above) cannot guarantee keeping online services secure. Key loggers, phishing and interception are all cited as credible risks, with information about how to carry them out and the tools to do so easily discoverable on the internet.

In a foreword to the report, Ciaran Martin, Director General for Cyber Security at GCHQ (cool job title!) said: “Complex passwords do not usually frustrate attackers, yet they make daily life much harder for users. They create cost, cause delays, and may force users to adopt workarounds or non-secure alternatives that increase risk.”

It suggests that simplifying an organisation’s approach to passwords can reduce the workload on users, lessen the IT burden, and – crucially – “combat the false sense of security that unnecessarily complex passwords can encourage.”

It lists seven key steps that organisations (and individuals) can take to optimise system security, which are:

  1. Change all default passwords (well, durr)
  2. Only implement passwords when needed to minimise user overload
  3. Understand the limitations of user-generated passwords (tl:dr they encourage insecure behaviour)
  4. Except machine-generated ones have their own problems (tl:dr they’re difficult to remember)
  5. Prioritise admin, mobile and remote user accounts as these are more important/vulnerable
  6. Use account lockout and protective monitoring
  7. And, of course, don’t store passwords as plain text

Will seeming to be good, impartial advice, it’s worth remembering that this does come from the people who broke antivirus software so they could spy on people, so feel free to take it with a piece of salt if you are of a cynical disposition.

ad-blockers, apple, ios9, data, advertising

Why ad-blockers really aren’t the data privacy win you might think

Ad-blockers shot straight to the top of the paid-for apps list in the App Store when Apple’s iOS9 update that allowed users to block mobile advertising was released.

So far, so not unusual – ads are pesky little things, right? Popping-up unexpectedly when you least expect them and generally bloating pages, crucifying page load times and eating up data allowances. Not to mention their tracking qualities as well as the past searches and purchases that stalk you round the web, site after site, day after day. Nope, no redeeming features at all – let’s block them all.

Then something unexpected happened – Marco Arment, creator of the no1 paid ad-blocker Peace, pulled it from the store after just two days, saying that “success didn’t feel good”.

What exactly the problem is remains unclear, altrhough comments on the Instapaper’s founder’s blog where he talked of needing to find a “more nuanced, complex approach” offer some clues.

He added: “Ad blockers come with an important asterisk: while they do benefit a ton of people in major ways, they also hurt some, including many who don’t deserve the hit.”

What Arment seems to be alluding to is what Seth Godin termed the shared understanding that websites offer free content in return for attention. For most sites, advertising is what quite literally pays the content creation bills.

Of course, pages have become increasingly riddled with evermore intrusive ads over the past few years, and it’s hard not to see that the reader has been assailed from all sides. So the appearance of ad-blockers was only going to end one way. Or, as Godin put it: “In the face of a relentless race to the bottom, users are taking control, using a sledgehammer to block them all.”

But still the fact remains that readers and sites have been in a mutually-beneficial relationship where advertising has played a key role in funding content for which there is demand but no serious suggestion that users would pay the full creation cost. And that remains the case even as ad-blocking apps proliferate.

So if ad blocking is not the answer, what is? There is clearly change needed on both sides – advertisers needs to show self-restraint and not machine gun content over every page we open, while users need to understand that on the internet, as with so many things, we can’t simply have the good for free without giving something back.

But there also needs to be a fundamental shift in how we think about data. We don’t like these ads that follow us around, or trackers, because they feel like an assault on our privacy. Yet it is the information gained through this that allows businesses to begin to better target our wants and interests.

I say begin, as the data available to date is so thin and incomplete that it is estimated to be up to 30-50 per cent wrong, to the obvious detriment of both the business and user.

Imagine how much more beneficial for both sides a rich data set would be – useful data 100 per cent certified and licensed at source, used to target appealing ads back to that same user.

A vision for the future to be sure, but a vision that comes ever closer as the Internet of Me follows close on the heels of the Internet of Things, with companies like digi.me at the forefront of this digital revolution.

internet of things

What is the Internet of Things?

As the latest estimates claim the number of devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT) will jump from 15 billion now to 50 billion in 2020, we look at what a connected world actually means.

What is the IoT? Well, at its most basic level, it is a network of devices fitted with data-capturing sensors that can connect to the internet, talking wirelessly to each other, applications – and indeed us. And these devices? They’re things in your home, things you wear, wearables such as Fitbit and the car you drive.

The phrase IoT has been in circulation for nearly a decade in technology circles, but only now with smart, connected devices such as thermostats and refrigerators, as well as driverless cars, becoming a reality is it something that is becoming relevant to the majority of the population.

What would a truly connected world look like? More straightforward is one answer, as all these intelligent little machines that between them know so much about us and our lives start to co-ordinate.

In classic examples, your alarm clock wakes you up and then tells your coffee machine to start boiling ready for a morning cuppa, while on the drive to work your car knows the quickest route for where and when you need to be, and can even text whoever you’re meeting if you’re running late.

Lots of smart devices, collecting and streaming huge amounts of user data and providing real-time information on, well, just about anything. Performing nominated tasks on demand and combining to make life as frictionless as possible. After all, how much easier would life be if your house’s heating could tell it was about to break and was able to summon an engineer itself before it actually did so?

And these devices could bring real benefits, not least cost as well as convenience, to all our lives. The heating that knows to turn itself off or down on a sunny day will save individual users money, as potentially could smart cars that send data about how they are being driven to insurance companies to feed into premiums.

The decreasing cost of computer power means there is no cost barrier to entry for putting sensors that can generate data in the most mundane items, and there is clearly no shortage of opportunities for smart machines that can do something in addition to their primary, practical purpose.

With so much data zipping around, questions about privacy and security are at the forefront of concerns and there are clearly many debates to be had around the IoT, its limitations and indeed its strengths.

But one thing is not in doubt – a huge amount of data is going to be generated, and how that is analysed and interpreted is going to be key to how successful the IoT is, for individuals and businesses alike.

Of course, at digi.me, we believe in returning the power of data to the owner, for them to use and permission as they wish, in both their personal and public lives.

The Internet of Things, and its natural successor the Internet of Me, where the individual is at the centre of their connected life, is a natural fit for us, as control returns to the user. Businesses need accurate rich data, which an individual is best placed to provide – but only if they want to and only if it is worth their while.

Leveraging the IoT is the dream for many companies, but here at digi.me we’re already got a headstart – and you can  try it out for yourself with a free download of our amazing app.

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Could the great personal data sell-off affect you?

The biggest danger to your personal data could be hiding in plain sight – and the law is not on your side.

We’re constantly warned to take care with our data. Be careful who we give it to, know what they want it for. Control it, be cautious with it, take care that those who guard it are taking appropriate security measures.

Yet a simple loophole that could see your data being sold on, even if you had instructed the company not to do this when handing it over, has come to light. And it’s perfectly legal, and happening frequently.

When a company who has your data goes into administration and appoints liquidators, they are charged with making as much money as possible from any remaining assets to reduce the debt to creditors. And guess what has a lot of commercial value? Yes, correct – your data.

This data, this personal information about you shared in good faith with one company, is now an asset for sale, available to the highest bidder who can in turn do what they want with it.

While the Information Commissioner’s Office states that anyone handing over their data has a “reasonable expectation” of how that data will be used,  selling it on, often to a company in the same industry, does not seem to breach this – in practice if not in spirit.

This astounding state of affairs was highlighted this week by a consumer programme on BBC Radio Four, where a woman from London was, in her words, “innundated” with emails and calls from other providers after the ferry company she had used went bust.

Adamant that she had “ticked boxes” stating her details should not be passed to third parties, she was powerless when liquidators Ernst and Young were appointed and the customer list was, quite legally, sold on. As she started being “bombarded” by unsolicited contact, she asked one where they had got her details from, and was told it was from the receivers. The same receivers who never contacted her to ask permission to sell on her data.

She told the programme: “The government are always saying you need to look after your data and you shouldn’t share it with people you don’t know, and then then they take it upon themselves to nominate someone who can sell it on and I think it makes a mockery of keeping your business private.”

An insolvency expert told the programme that, while not familar with that exact case, the underlying action was widely recognised as acceptable. Companies, those holding data and those acting as receivers or liqiuidators, are required to follow data protection laws, but crucially that doesn’t restrict data from being sold on as a commodity. Which is a pretty shocking state of affairs.

Stories like this highlight how powerless consumers are in many ways once they hand over their data, losing control of where it goes and what it does without ever having done anything wrong.

While never sharing any data is unrealistic if you want goods and services in this modern age, sharing the bare minimum is obviously good practice.

Companies such as digi.me are working on solutions to these trust issues, building a data-driven future where you are at the centre of your connected life, crucially in complete control of who has access to your data and what you get in return, but the full realisation of this is some way off.

But you can start claiming back some control by downloading a free version of our app now, collecting information about you distributed across various social media sites and reclaiming it for your own use and purpose.


Online privacy – is there a simple route to the ‘Internet of Me’?

Privacy concerns continue to grow over personal data use and leaks, and this week those concerns were highlighted in the New Scientist in their editorial (29th August – https://www.newscientist.com/issue/3036).  From reflecting the opinion of many that “Privacy is dead”: to asking how we got here, “Data has become currency”; to thinking about solutions, “Such systems are complex”; to worrying that if the effort to restore privacy doesn’t start soon then “vested interests may become too deeply entrenched to overturn”.

If we think the solution is complex as suggested by the New Scientist, then it is less likely we’ll find the right answer; however, I would like to suggest that there is in fact a very simple solution.

To see what that simple solution is we need to think why our data is so valuable and therefore why businesses are trying to track us. The answer is because the businesses believe they can provide better services , better convenience or sell more to us if they know who we are in many different dimensions.  If this were not true then there would be no value in our data and no value in tracking us.

But how good is the data they get? – not very is the actual answer. This is why of course ever more complex and invasive methods of tracking and associating data are being deployed – at great cost.  Even then the best anyone gets is a thin slice of you which can be 30-50% wrong.

Even this poor performance is threatened by the new ad blocking, do not track and other privacy ‘solutions’ now being deployed.  No one is winning here: not the individual nor the businesses.

Is there a better way? – to use the marketers phrase a “win-win” for both consumers and businesses? The answer is yes there is and what is more it is straightforward.

If I own, hold and control all my own data then businesses can come direct to me and ask for that data.  They get access to Rich data: data which covers a much wider set than they can get by tracking; which is deeper in time; which is 100% accurate, with no association errors (it is about me because it comes from me); which is fully permissioned; which is simple to get – just one person to come and ask.  If a business can get Rich data easily and very cheaply then why would they pay more for worse data obtained through tracking? Not only would they pay more for less they would also not get our trust.

By coming direct to us they get Rich data, cheaper, easier and with our trust.  When more and more businesses start to do this the market for tracked data will diminish and then disappear – a better solution for everyone.

How do we get there? We need software in place which gathers and holds our data for us on our own devices and cloud infrastructure, and which enable businesses to come to us for data which we can authorise (or not).  Luckily this process has started already, for example our company digi.me – see http://digi.me/video, and there will be others joining the party too.

Privacy is not an insoluble problem, nor a difficult win. You just have to look at the motives of everyone involved and fashion a simple win-win solution.

Oliver Wendell Holmes, the famous 19th century American physician and writer said: “I wouldn’t give a fig for the simplicity this side of complexity but I’d give my life for simplicity on the far side of complexity”.

With regards to privacy that simple solution the other side of complexity exists – it is that we own and control our own data on our own devices.  An “Internet of Me”, where I am truly the centre of my data world.

Digi.me-logo-with grey-text-inline

10 ways digi.me gives you back control of your data

News of data breaches and leaks has been everywhere recently, particularly in the wake of the Ashley Madison hack.

And yet, as our popular blog on the apps that are spying on your life proved, we are giving more and more about ourselves away without questioning it, often in the mistaken belief it is the only way we can access free services.

Two big (often unspoken) truths are that many apps ask for many more permissions than they need as a default, and also that free does not have to mean giving up the rights to the data that makes up you.

Here at digi.me, we like to think in terms of the internet of me – you, at the centre of your world, fully in control of what data about you is shared and with whom. Clearly, with so much about each of us already in the wild, that full dream remains a work in progress, but our app gives you back control of your data for you to choose and use as you wish. How? Well, here are just some of the ways:

  1. By backing-up your social network content. You can use digi.me to sync four accounts from the main social media platforms, meaning you can delete your accounts if you choose in future and still have whatever you posted there, complete with the original likes and comments.
  2. Having all the data YOU posted, at YOUR fingertips – you can jump around the journal view or search across all platforms to find something you need without being constrained by search or any post visibility activated by the channels themselves.
  3. By us NEVER seeing any of your data, yet bringing it to you in a format that you can easily search and use.
  4. Run a small business and want to analyse when your posts get most interaction? Use our insight tool to find out what and when you should be posting, or download your follower data in a spreadsheet to investigate how it has grown or who has stopped following you.
  5. Feeling overwhelmed by the size of your networks? See who you have most interactions with on Facebook, for example, if you’re minded to create lists. Or see who is no longer friends with or following you if you want to cull them back.
  6. Use our flashback feature to see what you were doing on this day last year, the year before or five years ago – remember things you wanted to do, or anniveraries of things you did do that might otherwise be forgotten.
  7. Make a collection – your favourite pictures or interactions, stored together, and able to be saved and downloaded as a PDF, complete with the original comments.
  8. Compliance requirements for your business? Find anything you’ve ever said and reuse or record as necessary in a matter of moments.
  9. Organise your content into collections, grouping similar content or separating public and personal. All, of course, easy to find when you need it again for any reason.
  10. By having, at your fingertips, the complete story of you. What you said, what you did and who you did it with, even the ability to add thoughts, moments and pictures that were not (gasp!) documented on social media.

Sharing everything for free use is not good data privacy, is not the future and should not be how the world works. Join the online revolution, start taking your data power back and download digi.me for free today!


Digital innovation in the UK ‘at risk because of personal data concerns’

The UK’s move towards a digital-first society risks being slowed because of public concerns over the use of personal data, a new report has found.

The sharing of personal data is both crucial for innovation and also improving personal online experiences, which is only made possible through tailoring services based on unique data.

But while we live in a connected society, and give out information about ourselves dozens of times a day on social media or by using online services, the ongoing sharing and use of that data is still creating significant unease among consumers.

The Trust in Personal Data UK review by Digital Catapault set out to assess the UK’s progress on the way to becoming a data-driven nation and found three clear issues: the public care about personal data but a knowledge gap remains; consumers don’t trust organisations with their data and they also don’t understand the benefits of sharing personal data.

Some of the key statistics from the report:

  • 96pc of respondents claim to understand the term ‘personal data’, but only two-thirds (64pc) picked the correct definition
  • 65 per cent of consumers are unsure if their data is being shared without their consent
  • 30pc of respondents believe they are responsible for educating themselves on the use and protection of data
  • 32pc believe this responsibility lies with the government
  • 30pc declare themselves interested in a service to help them collect, manage and preserve personal data
  • 79pc believe the primary use of personal data is for organisations’ own economic gain
  • 21pc of consumers say monetary gain would convince them to share their personal data

The study saw 4,005 consumers aged between 18 and 64 questioned earlier this year. By far the biggest concern when asked about data fears (76pc) was that they had no control over how it their personal information is shared and who it is shared with.

Infographic: the survey in numbers (PDF)

Equally, what would make the most people (43pc) share their data was if it was going to be used for public good, for example in the fields of healthcare or education.

Media (28pc) and retail (30pc) were the sectors seen as most guilty of using personal data without being clear they do so, with the public sector (43pc) seen as most trustworthy in this area.

It was also clear that respondents did not believe they benefited from sharing data with organisations, with the vast majority (79pc) believing instead that only the organisations profited economically from having it shared with them.

People were happier to share their data if they were paid, with £30 a month being the most popular option (61pc), which does at least show potential for mutually-beneficial working together between businesses and consumers if trust and best practice issues can be overcome.

Interestingly, the report did find a general increase in data knowledge, but because this was largely as a result of negative media coverage of data breaches, the potential opportunities and benefits of data sharing have often been sidelined.

One overwhelmingly clear issue is the desire for control – a huge 94pc of those questioned want to be more in control of the data they share, how they share it and what they get back from it – a mindset that mirrors exactly the wisdom behind the setting up of digi.me, which gives control of your data back to you, to use and organise as you choose.

In summary, the report finds: “In future, the creation of trust in the way consumers share personal data will be one of the defining competitive differentials for business.

“Moreover, it will be one of the key dependences in creating better citizen services and improving the way we all live.”

Digital stakeholders at all levels of all businesses in sectors across the marketplace need to be doing all they can to recognise and reassure that personal data, as Dame Wendy Hall says in the report’s foreword to prove to the public “that data will be used responsibly, be stored safely and called upon sparingly”.

What do you think? Do you have trust in how your personal data is stored or used? Let us know in the comments below.

Beach holiday, don't forget your memories this holiday

Don’t forget your memories this summer

With the constant rush to always find and post about the next big adventure to keep up with those around us, we risk devaluing and forgetting the past, as well as accidentally archiving our own precious memories.

Are you following the mass exodus overseas or to the coast to make the most of the summer holidays?  Maybe you’re just trying to do something, anything, to fill up some of those six long weeks where the children are off school?

Whatever your plans, I’ll bet you’re expecting to take plenty of pictures to cement those lovely new memories you’ll make, of family time or fun with friends, where everybody is happy, relaxed and smiling, right?

Of course you are – it’s completely natural to document the best times of our lives, and then want to share the results with those who care about what we did and who we did it with.

But think back a year – can you remember what you were doing then? Who you were with, what you did, where you went?

Chances are you were having (another) brilliant time, which you documented by taking loads of pictures and sharing them to your social media platforms, probably to lots of likes and admiring or jealous comments.

But then what did you do? Unlike times past, where pictures would be sent away to be printed, with their return awaited with joyful anticipation and the whole experience relived as they were put in a photo album for posterity, things have moved on.

While online storage and display has many benefits, not least in saving bookcase space for actual books instead of photo albums, it has also made it much easier – arguably too easy – to archive our memories, both virtually and in the real world.

In the rush to find, and document, the next big thing and keep up with those we are connected with online, how often do we go back and relive the memories of good times past?

Those memories are still just as strong and vivid, the experience just as clear – and revisiting those pictures will evoke happy feelings all over again, but only if we remember to look for them and enjoy them once more.

But how to find them easily? If you’re an avid social media user – and that’s most of us these days – you’ll have posted many more pictures, albums and posts in the 52 weeks since last Summer.

While you can search within most platforms, these tools are clunky at best and can take just long enough to find what you are looking for that it takes the shine off the whole experience.

Not digi.me though, there all of your posted pictures (and statuses for that matter) are archived in an easily searchable way. And if you posted different ones on different platforms? No problem, they are all in one place, safely stored on your computer for you to enjoy in the way that best suits you.

Scroll through the dedicated photos section, with everything organised chronologically. Hit the flashback button and see what you were doing one, two and more years ago.

Maybe you want to make a collection of all of your holiday pictures from years past? See everything posted about your holiday across all social networks, complete with likes and comments, in one place – and export the data you want to a place of your choosing.

Whatever you want to do with your data, the story of your life, digi.me lets you. Download a copy for free now and release your memories as you let your data soar free.

Man on Phone Privacy

What Does Your Phone Know About You?

These days we really do rely on our mobile phones and it is quite scary to think how much your phone knows about you, where you have been and who you have seen.  It even knows some of your favourite hobbies, interests and activities. It is in essence your digital brain!  What would you do without it?

Mobile phones have moved on an incredible amount over the past 30 years, from a device that is clunky and cumbersome to small, light incredibly fast computers that fit in our pockets and handbags. We connect other devices to them such as our fitness trackers, smartwatches, children’s toys and much more.  They are the central hub of our daily lives.  As such they collect a massive amount of data about us.  Some of which is passed on to the applications that we use and some just sits idle on the phone.  Then there is some data that goes back to the carrier as well and some that is collected by the sites that we browse. They are complicated little devices and often we forget just how valuable that data is to us until we lose or break our phone.

A couple of weeks back I wrote a piece on how you can find your phone using the data stored online about you that relates to your phone and it’s location.  This week I thought we would look more at just what data there is on these devices and why it is important to secure and back up your phone and it’s content.

Most mobile phones these days have the option for you to store a copy of your photo’s and contacts in the cloud.  This means that every new contact and photo is saved both on your phone and somewhere on the internet.  The chance of losing this data is low unless of course you haven’t set your phone up to do that. It is one of the first things I set up whenever I get a new phone and I would recommend that if you haven’t done this already then do it as it is a life saver when your phone is damaged or lost as you still have all your contacts and those precious pictures of friends and family.

The next thing that I always set up is a way to secure my phone so that if I lose it someone else can’t just use my phone, run up a massive bill and cause all sorts of trouble. I have heard too many friends lose their phones abroad and because it is abroad they are still liable for the call charges made. Put a pin on it and it is at least a deterrent. You can also turn on phone tracking and remote wipe which take that process one step further. The only issue with these is that you need to have GPS turned on and this can be a bit of a battery drain. You can still find your phone’s last known location through other means so to me this is not essential.  Android phones track where you are using a process called triangulation which uses WiFi and cellular data to identify where you were last so I tend to use that as my fallback.

The apps that you have installed on your phone and have paid for are all stored by the app store where you bought them from so these too are recoverable. The data within these apps is stored remotely too by the app creators. As long as you have stored your contacts, pics and videos remotely you should be able to pretty much recreate your device time and time again. This is the beauty of distributed data.

Looking at this another way though all that distributed data is accessible from a single point – your phone. Once someone has that they have access and potentially control of everything. Just bear that in mind the next time you turn your phone on and you haven’t got any security turned on. You are putting your online identity at risk. That digital footprint that we have talked about here on the blog a few times could become compromised if you don’t protect it properly.

This article was brought to you by digi.me who put you in control of your social media content. Download it now to protect your digital memories.